The ten best houses that perfectly embody biophilic design

The ten best houses that perfectly embody biophilic design

The ten best houses that perfectly embody biophilic design

The ten best houses that perfectly embody biophilic design

The word “biophile” has been buzzing around the architecture world lately, and with good reason. As our cities fall victim to overpopulation, it is extremely important to mitigate the effects of urbanization as much as possible and preserve the remaining green spaces that are slowly but surely dying. Biophilic design aims to create spaces that help us create and maintain an intimate connection with nature. It is an architectural approach that tries to connect our human inclination to interact with nature to the buildings we live in. Biophilic design elements can be effortlessly incorporated into any living space simply by adding green plants and natural light. These elements create environments that are peaceful, tranquil, and nurturing. They have a positive effect on our mental and general well-being. And we’ve curated a few homes that make that perfect! From a minimalist Japanese house with an interior garden to a concrete house with a green roof that cascades like a ramp, these architectural structures embody fully biophilic design.

1. Welcome to the jungle house

Designed by architecture studio CplusC Architectural Workshop for its director Clinton Cole, the Welcome to the Jungle House was built in Sydney partly from recycled materials. The house features a rooftop vegetable garden and an aquaponic system inhabited by fish.

Why is it remarkable?

The house was designed and built as an experiment in sustainable urban living. The rooftop vegetable garden and aquaponics system function as key elements of the home and have been incorporated in an effort to help residents have and maintain a better and stronger connection with nature.

what we like

  • Designed to fight the climate emergency
  • Equipped with solar panels

What we don’t like

  • Climate change has already disrupted the home’s aquaponic system

2. Villa KD45

In the hot, bustling city of New Delhi is Villa KD45, a majestic home defined by a flowing ramp-like green roof that adds a somewhat surreal and biophilic element to the otherwise brutalist concrete home. The home rises like a gentle wave from the landscaped ground on which it is built, giving the impression of a subtle tsunami flowing on an angled lot.

Why is it remarkable?

As well as featuring a unique cascading shape, the roof is populated by concrete planters, giving it a rather calming green effect. The rest of the house is also heavily marked with trees, gardens and many shrubs. The striking presence of green in the home contrasts beautifully with the concrete and rough look of the home, tactfully balancing the rough and the smooth, the soft and the hard.

what we like

  • The terrace also features a landscaped garden that offers great views of the neighborhood park
  • Large sliding doors create a delightful indoor-outdoor connection between this area and the garden

What we don’t like

  • The property seems quite difficult to maintain

3. Atri


Designed by a company called Naturvillan, Atri is a newly built A-frame villa on the shore of Lake Vänern. With a rather large shape that immediately catches the eye, the house also manages to be self-sufficient, climate-friendly and sustainable. It’s like a sustainable greenhouse in the middle of the mountains! The house also offers stunning views of the lake as well as the surrounding majestic trees and natural lot with rock slabs.

Why is it remarkable?

Atri has a traditional A-frame shape, with a fairly stable base embedded right into the mountains. It also features a continuous axis, so you can look through the entire house in a single view! As you slowly look up at the house, you will notice that it blends artfully with the trees, effortlessly becoming a part of the natural landscape and seeming to be one with nature.

what we like

  • Self-sustaining and sustainable
  • Climate smart

What we don’t like

4. Oasis Towers


Dutch architecture firm MVRDV designed the Oasis Towers development in Nanjing, China. The structure, which functions as a residential and commercial complex, consists of two L-shaped skyscrapers with fascinating cascading terraces. The facades of the skyscrapers mimic cliffs, giving them a rather jagged and geometrically interesting look.

Why is it remarkable?

The most interesting highlight of the towers is the lush green “oasis” located in the center of the site. This verdant landscape slowly moves outwards, blending harmoniously with the cascading terraces. It functions as a biophilic element of the architectural structure, and quite an imposing one at that. “With Oasis Towers, we wanted to push this trend to the max – not just mimicking nature with sweeping, layered ‘cliffs’, but literally including nature with the greenery in the design and utilizing natural processes,” said MVRDV co-founder Tiny Maas.

what we like

  • The terraces are clad in recycled bamboo and covered with trees and other greenery
  • The green area ensures privacy for the residents of the upper floors

What we don’t like

5. The hillside house


3D visualizer and international architect Milad Eshtiyaghi is known for his enchanting architectural creations that you always want to see in real life! Some of them are concepts while others manage to morph into something tangible. The Slope House is one of his unconventional creations that perfectly embodies biophilic design inside and out. The house is an A-frame cabin, but a rather unconventional one. It’s a square wooden shack perched on an idyllic hill somewhere in the depths of the Brazilian rainforest.

Why is it remarkable?

Dubbed the Slope House, the log cabin retains a distinctive triangular frame that is a thoughtful twist on the traditional A-frame cabin. The home has been designed with two modules – one is an internal structure that houses the master bedroom while the other contains all the main living spaces – the kitchen, dining area and study. Eshtiyaghi’s tiny cabin is said to rest on a truss system specifically chosen to minimize the house’s impact on the pre-existing landscape.

what we like

  • The house is a rather funky and fun twist on the traditional A-frame cabin
  • Natural plants have been added inside the house as a small garden

What we don’t like

  • The theme and shape of the house may be a bit too eccentric for some

6. The Melting House


The Melt House was built at the request of a young family who wanted to “feel green” in their home. Designed by Satoshi Saito of the SAI Architectural Design Office, it was intended to be a home that not only feels green in appearance, but is truly green in essence, allowing the family to actively use the outdoor space and blend in with the greenery grow.

Why is it remarkable?

The main attraction of this house is its centerpiece – which is basically a dry garden that acts as a multifunctional space in the middle of the house. The double-height space almost resembles a courtyard, connecting the two main structures that make up the house. Clerestory windows have been woven through the space, allowing a generous amount of sunlight to stream in, while sliding doors separate it from the outside. This creates an interesting indoor/outdoor connection.

what we like

  • It has an impressive drying garden that also serves as a multi-purpose room
  • The house allows its residents to grow with the greenery

What we don’t like

  • A garden in the middle of the house can be difficult to cultivate and maintain

7. The Rain Tree House


Raintree House is a beautiful modern retreat that offers stunning views of the sea as well as the exotic jungle surroundings. Located in the northwestern province of Guanacaste, Costa Rica, it was designed to ensure it “feels like it’s always been there”.

Why is it remarkable?

The house aims to be a beautiful example of sustainable architecture and blends seamlessly into its surroundings. The project was led by the studio’s chief design officer, Benjamin G. Saxe. It’s heavily inspired by the tall trees that stand around it, as well as the tangled foliage and raised canopy nearby.

what we like

  • Causes minimal damage to the area surrounding the house
  • Sustainable + environmentally friendly

What we don’t like

8. Easyhome Huanggang Vertical Forest City Complex


Five imposing sustainable green towers were designed together to create Easyhome Huanggang Vertical Forest City Complex. This complex was built to mitigate the effects of urbanization and fight for the ecological survival and preservation of our cities. This is extremely critical as our cities are becoming more and more populated by the day and in these current times it is imperative to focus on sustainable and biophilic architecture.

Why is it remarkable?

Conceived as “a totally innovative green space for the city”, the Waldstadt complex is a form of biophilic architecture that incorporates growing and teeming greenery into the structure and essence of residential buildings.

what we like

  • 404 different trees fill Easyhome’s footprint, absorbing 22 tons of carbon dioxide and producing 11 tons of oxygen over the course of a year
  • Increases biodiversity by attracting new species of birds and insects

What we don’t like

9. The Wall House


Wall House designed by CTA is a multi-generational family home in Bien Hoa, Vietnam. The house is characterized by perforated bricks intended to bring air and sunlight into the house. These perforated square bricks help create a living space that feels open, free-flowing and airy – which were the clients’ requirements.

Why is it remarkable?

A small garden was laid out around the house to create a spacious indoor and outdoor connection. This was done by planting trees and leafy green plants throughout the home, which in turn added a nice biophilic element to the home. The presence of the trees and plants makes you feel like you are in a garden and not at someone’s home!

what we like

  • Generous amounts of light and air flow into the house, improving air quality

What we don’t like

  • The aesthetics of the house may not be universally pleasing

10. Hug house


This modern eco house architecture concept is called the Hugging House and features a beautiful garden roof while managing to incorporate the natural landscape of the site into its layout. The Hugging House designed by Veliz Arquitecto is still a concept, but one we’d love to bring to life.
Hugging House is a modern eco house architecture concept that features a garden roof and incorporates the country’s natural landscape into its floor plan.

Why is it remarkable?

If built, the location of the hugging house would be fully integrated into the design of the house. Veliz Arquitectos describes the design in his own words: “We took advantage of the slope of the property to create visual connections with the existing vegetation and beyond the landscape at different heights [used] the premises with which we always try to characterize the project.”

what we like

  • Features a garden roof
  • A fascinating floating staircase

What we don’t like

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